Tag: EZ2See Calendars

Retailers

Nationwide

Amazon
See Listing

Arizona

ViewFinder Low Vision Resource Center
1830 S Alma School Rd  Suite 131
Mesa, AZ  85240
(480) 924-8755

ViewFinder Low Vision Resource Center
10001 W. Bell Road, Ste. 115
Sun City, AZ 85351
(623) 583-2800

California

The Adaptations Store at the San Francisco Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1155 Market Street
10th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 694-7301

Braille Institute of America, Inc.
741 North Vermont Avenue
Los Angeles, CA  90029
(323) 906-3124

Illinois

Chicago Lighthouse
1850 W Roosevelt Rd
Chicago, IL  60608
(312) 666-1331

Maryland

Independence Marketplace
National Federation of the Blind
200 East Wells Street
Baltimore, MD 21230
(410) 659-9314

Minnesota

Ashley’s Hallmark Gifts Store
3250 41st St NW
Rochester, MN 55901
(507) 252-5000

Peoples Food Coop of Rochester
519 1St Ave SW
Rochester MN  55902
(507) 289-9061

Missouri

Society of the Blind and Visually Impaired
8770 Manchester Road
Brentwood, MO  63144
(314) 968-9000

New York

Northeastern Association of the Blind at Albany (NABA)
301 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY 12206
(518) 463-1211

Wisconsin

Vision Forward
912 N Hawley Road
Milwaukee, WI  53213
(414) 615-0100

Wisconsin Council of the Blind & Visually Impaired
754 Williamson St.
Madison, WI 53703
(800) 783-5213 or (608) 255-1166

Sharing Tips I’ve Learned

Occasionally I’m invited to share lessons I’ve learned as I deal with vision loss and show some of the devices I find helpful.  At more than one, I’m encouraged to put this information on to the internet.  So here goes.

The first thing you need to know is that every state has a program specifically devoted to assisting people of all ages who are dealing with vision loss and blindness.  They are a tremendous resource, so seek out your state’s program.  Look for State Services for the Blind or something like it.  They have professionals who can come out to you and they may also be able to provide useful training, products and/or devices at no charge.  

Over my 60+ years, I slowly at first and later more rapidly, lost eyesight.  In a way, I’m lucky.  I’ve had the time to learn a lot of coping skills.  I’m convinced that a big part of dealing with vision loss is mental.  By mental, I mean the many unconscious habits we have.  Perhaps these actions were positive and helpful in the past.  But it’s likely that some of them are not anymore.  Some may now even be harmful or dangerous.  

Your challenge is to recognize those habits that are no longer helpful.  Let’s call them, “Habits to Stop” or H2S.  One clue that you’ve found an H2S is when you find yourself frustrated over something you just did such as walking in, setting your keys down and later can’t find them.  When you notice an H2S, you might even want to stop and say out loud, “Oh, an H2S”.  Finding and replacing it is the solution and your mission.

Once you’ve spotted an H2S, you’re on the path to success.  The next step is to find a replacement habit.   Lastly repeat it until it becomes subconscious and automatic.

In my next several blog posts, I will get very specific on the helpful habits I’m using.  I hope you’ll let me know if you find any of them helpful.  Perhaps you’ll share some of your own.

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When I get an order through the mail

One of the major things that motivated me to turn this calendar idea from something just for me into what it is now, was  the feeling I got hearing the comments from those first enthusiastic buyers.  I’d think to myself, “Wow, I’m really helping someone”.   Could this be what a teacher, medical professional or the like experiences as they go about their work?  How few of us ever get to experience such a feeling.   

As each handwritten first time or repeat mail order form arrives, it reminds me of that original feeling.  Sometimes people give me feedback via the website or in a note stuck in the envelope.  How rewarding it is to hear that this simple product is making a difference in people’s daily life.  

While orders to resellers and over the Internet to individuals are a vote of confidence, these mail-order customers are somehow special to me.  I hope I never lose this feeling.

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On Being Selected for the BizPitch Competition

Towards the beginning of the 2016, I was informed of an upcoming event called BizPitch.  It is put on by the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) in this area, a very helpful organization.  If you were selected, you could present your small business idea or actual start-up to a small group of local business-savvy people from various sectors. It was presented like the TV show “Shark Tank”, but without any money being offered.

I submitted my application and was one of 3 folks selected.  The director of the local SBDC office who alerted me to the opportunity, drove me to the event.  Fortunately, I wasn’t the first presenter because it showed me how it all worked.  It took place in the classroom of the local community college.  Tables ran around 3 sides of the room with the panel, observers and the other presenters sitting on the outside.  The first presenter was a young man with some kind of mobile app idea.  As he spoke from behind the lectern, it became apparent that the fellow was known to two of the panelists.  The feedback was basically, “yes we’ve heard all this before, what have you done with the advice we gave you last time?”  An awkward moment.  So I was prepared for some tough love.

Since no one said not to, I had already spread out all of my stuff on the tables on the 3rd side of the room.  So I was more or less ready when they said it was my turn.  I stood near my materials and talked about the situation people face who are dealing with vision loss as they try to manage their daily schedule.  I ran through my experience with seeking a product I could use and the path that eventually led to me starting my business.  That story is on my website if they wanted even more information.

Over the next 20 minutes I showed them the original, partial-year calendar that got so many people to urge me to start the business.  I showed them the 2016 version that I was selling and the Sample I created and sent out to prospective quantity buyers.  Then at the end I passed out the profit and loss statement that the accountant I had recently hired to  had created.  I finished up describing how my first year went and my plans for the next year.  

The time went by quickly and I heard little or nothing from anyone during my talk.  So I was unsure what they’d say.  With a smile growing on my face, I heard one positive statement after another from the panel.  Some assumed that I had a business background because they approved of all I had done.  One panelist was a numbers person and was thrilled to see actual figures on sales and expenses.  One panelist took a Sample to show in a near-by city to the entrepreneur support group there.  A young man who had come  to watch took a card to give to someone he knew would be interested.

The most ironic part of the day came when the 3rd presenter promoting a summer camp at an unused nearby facility, bought a calendar on the spot.  She was having increasing vision trouble and this was the first weekly planner that would work for her. That had to be my favorite part of the event.    

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EZ2See Products are on YouTube!

My story is on YouTube! Mark McGlinch, a fellow attendee of Rochester Open Coffee Club Tech Meetup, created and posted this video for EZ2See Products.

Periodically it was suggested that I make a video showcasing the calendar.  The idea was that seeing someone flip through it would do a better job explaining than reading words or looking at still images.

Okay, I get it, but where to get the help to do this at a price I could justify.

At an entrepreneur meeting, I had the good fortune to meet another semi-retired guy with a strong video background.  When I mentioned my product and that I was hoping to someday make a video, he was intrigued.

As so often happens, by being out and about, I’d met an interesting person and made a valuable connection and even a friend.  At our first real meeting, Mark said he wanted to do this.

I shared that I also had a video background and brought my descriptions of each shot of the video.  Needless to say, Mark was happy that much of the groundwork was done.

Some time later, he returned an updated and improved version of the shots.  Using his equipment and my kitchen as the set, we planned our next steps.

Mark’s version had fewer shot segments with longer limes for me to say.  Repeating them over and over I learned them, but just barely. Since I wouldn’t be able to see cue cards, getting help with my lines was my biggest challenge.  If I only knew braille better!

To keep the video brief, every word was important, so no ad libbing.  Eventually, all the segments were shot and Mark went off to put it all together.

It was a thrill when the email with the link to the video appeared.  Taking a deep breath, I watched it for the first time. Mark’s work was great, but I felt my delivery was awful.  It isn’t at all how I talk.

But Mark and my wife said it was fine.  So, with grateful thanks to Mark, and with their support, it went online and you can see it here.   Only time will tell how helpful people find it.

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On Coming Up With a Counter Top Display

During the first year, I had several retail outlets offering the calendar.  As the second year started to roll around, I spoke to all of them.  It appeared that those who best displayed the calendar sold them the fastest.  Most of them agreed that if they could stand up the calendar rather than laying it flat, more people would see it and possibly buy it.  Thus I was launched into the enormous world of “point of purchase” countertop displays.  After this experience, I will never look at product displays in the same way.  

After hours of store visits and online research, I narrowed down the options to two methods.  One was a fold up display made of white cardboard that could hold about 10 calendars.  The other option was a clear heavy plastic stand that would hold 3 calendars at a time.  Each had their advantages and disadvantages.

The cardboard ones were cheaper but when shipped were quite large.  Meaning they would not fit into the carton with the calendars.  This meant both additional shipping cost, hassle and the store had to do some assembly to set them  up.  Although the  acrylic display was more expensive, it  would fit in the carton with the calendars.  Lastly, I had to come up with a way to decide on  the text that should go on the display and how to get it on either display without costing an arm and a leg or looking like a middle school art project.

So much effort exerted to encourage a few additional sales.  But I choose not to look at it that way.  If my goal was and still is to get these weekly planners into the hands of people who need them, then I need to do what I can to support these retailers.  I chose the acrylic displays.  I used the computer to print out another slogan, “Finally a calendar you can see”.  My wife is far better with scissors and tape.  She affixed it to the small panel across the bottom and taped it so it almost looked professional.  Now we’ll just sit back and hear if it was worth all the effort.

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What’s in a slogan?

Why did I add the slogan to the cover, “The calendar with the edge”?  

Actually it started out, “The calendar with an edge”?   Was it too “gimmicky”?  

I kept hearing positive things about the benefit of the black edge around the weekly pages.  That simple feature really helps those who share the same challenge that I have.  I do not clearly see the edge of the page, especially  when it rests on a white work surface or on top of other papers.  So I decided to trademark this slogan and put it on the cover.  I’m proud to let people know that this calendar might help those who could use an “edge”.

Thoughts on improving the product after producing the 2016 edition

After the first year, it was time to consider what improvements were in order. For example, what about the location of the monthly pages; keep them up front, or slip them within the appropriate weeks?  The cover raised several questions:  alter the design, make it more durable, should it be a dark color?  What about the holidays?  Who knew there were that many to choose from?  Because  the design-print-sell cycle is so demanding, there was only a few months to make all of these decisions.  

With the help of a new graphics person, I updated the appearance of the cover.  Working with the printer, we found a way to both stiffen the cover and make it moisture-resistant and yet keep the cost down.  For now, I decided that a white cover is fine and we’ll keep the monthly pages up front where they are.

All of these plans and decisions took much discussion, research and some agonizing.  I  listen closely to the feedback I get and continue to try to make this the most usable and accessible product of its kind.  

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Thoughts on setting the price as a whole dollar rather than a few cents less

I don’t know about you, but I am not fooled when something is priced at $9.95.  That always means it costs $10 to me.  Frankly I wonder how many people are fooled by such psychological manipulation. Why did businesses first begin doing this?  I’m sure some very serious market research went into what seems a nearly universal practice.

So how do I price my product?

I’ve run this question past both friends, family and business professionals.  Based on what I heard, here’s what I’ve decided to do at least for now.  For the full-box order, don’t mess with the few cents less.   But for individual buyers the “few pennies less” price.

I guess old habits die hard.

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The Reluctant Blogger

Image of Edward, owner of EZ2See

Why would I want to write for a blog? Who would even read it?

My web person tells me that having a blog raises my webpage ranking.  When that happens, possibly more people will discover my calendar.  So yes, I do want more people to learn of this calendar.  Yet, doing a blog would mean I have to get comfortable inviting strangers into my “world”.  It begs the question, why would anyone be interested in what I’m doing to make and market these calendars, let alone anything else going on in my life.  

Then there is the very real fact that I barely can get done each day what needs to be done.  Now I’m supposed to write about it as well?  If I do this, I should sign it, “The Reluctant Blogger” So how do people who Blog find the time?  I suppose it comes down to the old adage, you make time for what you want to get done.  I will think seriously about this, especially if the posts can be short.

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