Tag: Edward Cohen

When Where You Are Is Not Where You Want To Be  

This Blog Post is quite different than my other ones.  This one came to me over time and seemed worth sharing.  I’m trying to put into words a philosophy for dealing with my vision-loss. It’s an attitude I’m trying to live by.   Perhaps it will strike a chord with you. Here’s how this thought came to me.

I have more trouble seeing now than I did about a year ago.  I have a couple of routes that I can walk to get to the store, the coffeeshop and downtown.  One is more shaded by trees than the other, so when it’s hot I take the more shaded route. While the coolness is nice, it is also darker.  A year ago, I could make out the curves in the sidewalk and paths where the shade was deepest.

However, this year I realized that I no longer could see the path in those shaded spots.  It was disheartening to face the reality that my eyesight had declined so much so fast. I stood there soaking in what this meant.  After a bit, with no visual clues, my handy long white cane found and kept me on the path. I slowly get past this and other sections and back on my way.  

Over time, I started to try and see beyond the deeply shaded sections.  If I could make out where the path picked up beyond these sections, I’d aim for them.   Combining confidence that comes from using my long white cane, some eyesight and this method, I’d get through these spots more quickly.  Later, I realized that if I could see someone on the path ahead of me, I’d try to use them as a moving target.

It was on one of those walks that it dawned on me that such a practice could be an allegory for the way one lives their life.  There will be times in our lives when we may feel lost, getting nowhere or unhappy with our current situation.

But if you have a big goal or a series of smaller goals, you have that spot in the path ahead to aim for.  If you don’t have such goals or if they are vague, work on them. Having goals and working towards them can be very helpful.

I also noticed that If someone was a bit ahead of me on the trail, I could use them to point the way forward. I translate this to mean, find or learn about someone who has walked a path similar to yours.  Especially if they are now in a “place” more like where you’d like to be. Guides, role models and mentors can make all the difference as you travel along your path.
Image of Edward, owner of EZ2SeeEdward Cohen is the creator of the EZ2See® weekly planner/calendar.

Saving Face: Spatial Awareness Suggestions

By saving face I don’t mean avoiding embarrassment, but it could mean that too.  I’m really talking about actually avoiding running your head or face into things while moving about your place.  Why in the world would this happen?

If you are someone who moves with ramrod straight posture, you can skip this blog post.  For the rest of us whose posture tends to assume a slight bow, read on.  

Moving in this way puts your head slightly forward of your torso.  In this position, with good eyesight in dark spaces, it’s potentially more likely for your head or face to contact the corners of walls or partially open doors.  

To reduce injury, consider these ideas.

  1. Try to always keep doors fully open or fully closed.  Close cabinet doors before walking away.
  2. Little lights can be helpful.  Put nightlights in selected outlets to offer some “navigation” aids. 
  3. Create your own “early warning system.”  This means that your hands will contact the object before the rest of you.  Use this defensive move when you aren’t positive of the situation, when going around corners or passing through doorways. Here’s how I do it.
    1. With your thumb pointing up, pivot one arm up so your hand is about centered on your body at a comfortable height.  Keep your fingers slightly curved towards you and won’t get jammed if they contact an object before the rest of you does.
    2. For extra protection, position both hands in front of you and lightly press your fingers together or rest one against the other’s palm or forearm.  Whatever seems comfortable to you, just be sure those fingers are several inches in front of any part of your face that you have become fond of.

But accidents can happen even when you’re standing still.  When you bend over, you can run your face into something below and in front of you.  The goal is to always remember to check before bending over.  Some things to remember to do before bending down:

  1. Sweep your foot or hand in front of you to see if something is there,
  2. Bend over slowly rather than immediately reaching for a dropped object,
  3. Take a step backwards before bending over, or  
  4. If you can, lower yourself instead of bending at the waist.  

Changing lifelong habits takes awhile.  The key is to begin to transition to habits that help you.  Let me know if you found something here helpful.  


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Image of Edward, owner of EZ2SeeEdward Cohen is the creator of the EZ2See® weekly planner/calendar. 

Finding Stuff, Part 2: Knowing Your Clothes

Finding stuff and then knowing what it is

Here are some tips to consider when poor eyesight impacts identifying your clothing items. What ever you do, it has to work for you.  Too many rules and it might not work over the long term.  You know yourself.  Find the right balance of simplicity and complexity that will help you.

  • The fewer variety of colors, patterns and styles you have, the less confusing it will be.
  • I love safety pins.  I use them to keep pairs of socks together before tossing them in the hamper.
  • By putting the pin at the top, heel or tow of the sock pair, it tells me the sock colors or material.
  • Do you have a pullover top that you have trouble identifying the front from the back?  Put a safety pin inside the rear collar.

Make your Closet a Helpful System

  • Organize related items by hanging them on the left or right side. If there are other natural dividers on the closet rod, use them.
  • Use different types of hangers for similar things.
  • Point the open end of the hanger hook facing towards or away for similar items.
  • Hang tops and bottoms that go together on the same hanger.
  • Let which side the buttons on a button up top face mean something.

If you swap out seasonal Items, maintain any order you’ve created by storing similar items together.

As I’ve said before, there are professionals trained in methods that will make your life easier.  Track down where you can find them.  Your state will have a program for either seniors or the blind.   Start by reaching out to them.

Lastly, if you have systems that work for you, please share them with me.

Image of Edward, owner of EZ2SeeEdward Cohen is the legally-blind creater of the EZ2See® weekly planner/calendar.

 

Finding stuff, Part 1: In the Kitchen

Finding stuff and then knowing what it is

If your eyesight no longer gives you the information you need about the world around you, it’s time to pay more attention to other senses.   The sense of touch is the sense most used by low-vision and blind people to learn about the world around them.  Below are things that I’ve come up with that work for me.  Please share some that work for you.  You may need sighted assistance to set up some of these.  

I’ve divided these tips into two parts.  This one focuses on dining issues and finding and identifying things in the kitchen. The next one deals with clothing issues.

Making eating a bit easier

  • Yes, you can touch your food to help get it onto a fork, but probably not when dining with strangers.
  • If you have some sight, consider selecting a plate or bowl with a color that contrasts with the contents to makes food easier to spot.  
  • Some meals are easier eaten in a bowl instead of on a plate.  This might help when dining out.

What’s in this container?

Rubber bands are my friend.  Here are a few ways I use them.

  • There are several similar salad dressing bottles in the fridge door, but my Italian dressing is the only one adorned with a rubber band.  
  • We store many dry items in identical glass jars.  The one with my corn chips have a rubber band around the cap.  My cracker jar has a rubber band around the bottle cap.
  • Olives always go into the same glass jar on which I’ve put a tactile bump on the cap.
  • Consider learning the braille alphabet.  Then you can use adhesive labels with a word or letter.

 Where is that button?

Our microwave and other appliances have a flat screen display, useless for the blind and low-vision.  

I put a tactile bump on the microwave 30 second and off button and I’m good to go.  These tactile bumps are small adhesive-backed raised dots.  An example you are familiar with is the one your cabinet doors close against, to protect the wood.   Find them online or at a hardware,  big box or dollar store.

There are so many handy tips and devices to make kitchen tasks easier.  Consider finding and working with a trained rehabilitation teacher.  They can be very helpful.  

My next post deals with identifying and managing clothing.

Image of Edward, owner of EZ2SeeEdward Cohen is the creator of the EZ2See® weekly planner/calendar.

With Spring Comes Yardwork

I don’t know about you, but when working in the yard I often can’t find the rake or other long-handled tool I had just set down.  This happens even when I consciously place it where I think I’ll find it.  It occurred to me that, just as a lack of contrast makes it hard to find things inside, that may be part of what is happening here.  

The wooden or metal handles blend in with the ground and trees.  They stand out better when laid on the sidewalk or driveway, but that isn’t the best idea.  When inside, I set things down in certain places and that really helps to find them.  But I’ve yet to develop such helpful habits when setting things down outside.  Of course, outside is much bigger than inside.  Maybe drag out an old garbage can to serve as the tool holder?  

So, now I’m thinking of how I can add some contrast to the tool.  White tape or white paint on the handle is one idea.  If I find something that works well, I’ll share it.  If you have already found a solution, would you share it with me?  I’ll pass on what comes in.

EZ2See Products are on YouTube!

My story is on YouTube! Mark McGlinch, a fellow attendee of Rochester Open Coffee Club Tech Meetup, created and posted this video for EZ2See Products.

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