As I’ve said in past Blog Posts, recognizing and then phasing out long-held habits that no longer help you anymore and forming and practicing new helpful ones that do, can reduce stress and make your life a little easier.  

Many of my other Blog Posts deal with how to reduce losing things and then finding things.  The tips below are along the same lines, but a bit different.

I avoid randomly setting down my wallet, keys and cane on returning home which used to lead to panic when I needed them when it was time to head out.  This no longer happens because I now have a small box by the door. I no longer have to look for them.

Here’s what I do to more easily locate the glass, cup or bottle from which I’m drinking.  Assuming I’m standing or sitting at a table or counter and have it in my hand, I press my elbow against the table’s edge with the item held upright.  Keeping my elbow touching, I lower the item to the table. To locate it, I contact the same spot with my elbow and lower my hand. Bingo, there it is.  This technique works for all sorts of similar purposes.

During a meal, do you misplace the piece of silverware you’re using; or worse yet, bump it and send it flying?  Get into the habit of consistently setting it on the far side of the bowl or plate with the handle pointing away from you.  

Overall, if you’re lucky enough to have any control over where things end up in your kitchen or elsewhere, the following might help:    

  1. Use the sides of cabinets the home for frequently used items.  
  2. If salt and pepper shakers are in identical containers without obvious tactile markings, decide which goes on the right or left.  Make up your own rule; here’s mine. I don’t favor pepper, so the container on the right is salt. Get it, salt is right and pepper is wrong, I mean left. 

Bottom line, I agree with the old saying, “A place for everything and everything in its place.”  

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